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. but, mr. president, i just want to say that i wholeheartedly support her in this position. there's a loft work that needs to -- there's a lot of work that needs to take place at f.h.a. i think she's somebody that has the ability to carry that out. and the biggest issue with f.h.a. right now, candidly, is this body and the folks down the hallway passing legislation to deal with overall housing finance. i know senator isakson from georgia's going to be very involved in that. i hope to be involved with that. my guess is the presiding officer is going to be involved in that. and yet today, my sense is we need to go ahead and have someone who's actually running f.h.a. to cause it to work better. and i hope my colleagues on this side of the aisle, as many as can, will join in, give her strong support today and then work closely with her to cause f.h.a. to be the kind of place that it ought to be. and it certainly -- i agree with the senator from georgia -- shouldn't have the market share that it has today. but a big part of that, again, a big part of that has to do with our inaction in
washington was writing romantic letters to a woman who was not mrs. washington. her name was sally terry fairfax, very attractive, older, sophisticated woman. what if washington letters have become public during the french and indian war or the revolutionary war? but just petraeus' e-mails became public and what if we got rid of george washington? bill clinton is not the first and not the worst in petraeus is not the first for the worse. in there ,-com,-com ma done that and there's a long history in infected pains me to say that even abraham lincoln visited a prostitute. i know, say it isn't so, right? but it happened. the details are sketchy and there's not a lot of letters written about this but here is what we can piece together. lincoln's best friend was joshua. >> speed and speed was as dashing and handsome and quote unquote lucky with the ladies as lincoln was unlucky and awkward and romance. speed felt sorry for lincoln in the eyes called each other by their last names, speed them again and speed invited lincoln to work in his general store and he didn't have a place to say so he
brennan recounts the life of the former first lady who died in 1993. ms. brennan discusses her use of mrs. nixon's recently released private documents. this is just under 50 minutes. >> welcome to the richard nixon presidential library and museum. my name is paul and i'm the acting director of the library. i appreciate all of you coming to one of our continuing author talk recitations. today, we are very fortunate to have really the leading scholar on pat nixon who is by the way of warren 100 years ago this year. mary brennan, did much who did much of her research here for her book, is the chair of the department of history at the university of texas and san marcos. her specialty is post-world war ii conservative movement and she has written to date, three different books those being turning right at the 60's, conservator capture of the gop, wives, mothers and the conservative women conservative women in the crusade against communism and of course the book we love the most around here which is "pat nixon" embattled first lady. her book is an outstanding work and i look forward to -- i w
better than that, mr. speaker. so as we honor her, a time that many of us feared would never happen, it is good to recognize that one phase of her work may be over but another phase, equally important, is just beginning, and that the united states will stand with her, with the president of burma and those who are reformers in the executive branch and the legislative branch, with the activist, with civil society, as they stand, the flickers of democratic progress and press forward with reforms, and we wish them all god speed. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, the speaker of the united states house of representatives, the hon. john boehner. [applause] >> once again let me say thank you all for your presence here in the capitol rotunda today. let me also thank secretary clinton and mrs. bush for joining us and thank my colleagues on both sides of the capital for their work in bringing us all together. mike collins sponsored the resolution, thank you. one leader in particular deserves recognition for his extraordinary devotion to this cause and that is my good friend senator mitch mcc
to rename this ira the kay bailey hutchison spousal ira in her honor, and i hope, mr. president, we can join together and honor senator hutchison by getting that done before we close out our business this year. kay, of course, has always championed the state sales tax deduction, which may not seem like a big deal to others in this carriage carriages but it . but it is a big deal in texas. we don't have a state income tax. but we do pay a state sales tax. and of course kay has also worked to reduce the marriage penalty tax. she's been a strong defender of taxpayer interests and her efforts have made the tax code less hostile to saving and to families. she alluded to her great work with nasa. she's one of the senate's leading supporters of nasa and human space flight, and of course gnaws i nasa has contribd historic technological breakthroughs that have benefited all americans. kay appreciated the importance of basic scientific research to long-term american prosperity and she appreciates the role that nasa has played in fostering innovation. she's long said and advocated for support for nasa
tennessee, despite her in. >> thank you, mr. chairman. commissioner mcdowell reference the wicca conference. chairman genachowski, weiss title ii still open? >> is common to have notices for this public interest and common as there has been here. we don't see uncertainty created by the preceding. the sector is quite strong and investment innovation going up to two geeks and there's uncertainty come from litigation. as i've done before, i called verizon to withdraw its litigation. that would increase certainty and allow us all to move forward. >> blow, have you had any discussions with the other commissioners chairman. you want to weigh in on that? >> real quick out respectfully disagree. when i speak with wall street analysts, that's one of the first questions i get is that of the future of the title ii docket at the time in 2010 there was an incredible amount of anxiety from the investment community over the docket. if it only comes up in conversations i have with international counterparts internationally. it does create uncertainty in the litigation against the order regarding regulation
marion for a third time. mrs. alexander did know about that when i told her she said she wasn't surprised that her grandfather said that he was the jim dandy and that characterization in her mind went along with this idea that at 71 he would marry for a third time. she told me the family story of how he learned to read and write. he learned in the presence of the little master or the white boy. this might well have been dolley's son payne todd who would be the object of the instruction and jennings would be standing to the side but listening and absorbing and learning. in the book i presented perhaps the first instance of jennings taking advantage of his position. he was the good listener and a good network. there are so many places he was associated with that are extent in washington today. one of them is not his own house. his own house located where else street and 18 intercept. some of you may remember until very recently was border's books and i would go there and i would go into the cafe. i was sitting in my coffee thinking i could be at paul jennings's kitchen table right now and u
this frustrating experience as a patient of mine that i was assigned to follow. her name is mrs. banks and she's in the opening of the book. she didn't want anything done for her cancer, which had spread all over. the doctors clearly wanted to do something. they essentially bullied her or talked her into it. they overstated the benefits and under siege at the risk, something we know from research happens, especially those of us who do procedures it just didn't seem right to me. it seemed as if profession wasn't telling the truth. he seemed medicine have long straight from its original mission and heritage. it's not why it went into medicine and i quite frankly quick. i started school where i met david-based evolution money. >> host: i'm sorry to interrupt. you are an medical school and you had enough and the two school public health? >> guest: i explained it at the morning conference. it turned me upside down for exciting to them she didn't want the procedure done. they basically implied it didn't matter what she wants. this is what she needed. this was to me definable culture that i observed
was mrs. banks and she is in the opening of the book. she really didn't want anything done for her cancer that had spread all over. the doctors clearly wanted to do something. if they essentially bullied her or talked her into it. the benefit and understated the risk, something we know from the research happens especially the dozens of us that do procedures it just didn't seem right to me. it seemed it seems to professional have long strained from his original mission and its heritage where i met david -- >> host: let me just interrupt. you were in medical school and you decided you had enough and you went to the school of public health? >> guest: they tore me upside down for explaining to them she didn't want the procedure done. it didn't matter what she wants. this is what she needs, and this is to me the sign of a culture that i had absorbed from the outside but didn't want to be part of, so i quit medical school and then i started graduate school for public health because i heard of a track on quality and there were people not interested in medical mistakes for the first time they wer
was assigned to follow. her name was mrs. bank and she is in the opening of the book. she really didn't want anything done for her cancer, which had spread all over. the doctors clearly wanted to do something. they essentially bullied her or talked her into it. they overstated the benefits and understated the risk, something we know from research happens-especially'll those that do procedures. is just didn't seem right to me. it seemed as if this profession wasn't telling the truth. it seemed as if the profession ol' medicine has long trade from its original mission and heritage. it's not why i went into medicine, and i, quite frankly, quit. i started school at public health where i met david bates. >> host: you were in medical school and you decided you had had enough and you went to school of public health? >> guest: yeah. i basically explained what mrs. banks wanted at our morning con fresh. they tore me upside-down for explaining to them that she didn't want the procedure done. they basically implied, didn't matter what she wantses. this is what she needs. and this was to me a sign of a
saying thank you all. i have a lot to be grateful for her. but mr. president, pna senator and since this is my farewell speech, i do have a few more things i'd like to say. i am leaving the senate at a moment in our history when america faces daunting challenges, both domestic and foreign and went too often our problems seem greater than our government's ability to solve them. but i can tell you that i remained deeply optimistic about america's future and constantly inspired by the special destiny but i'm convinced is ours as american. my hot medicine is based not in theory or hope, but in american history and in personal experience. i think particularly about my time in public life and especially the changes i've witnessed since i took the oath of office as a senator on january 3rd company and 89. the fact is over the past quarter century, america and the world have become freer and more prosperous. the iron curtain was peacefully torn down of the soviet empire defeated. the eternal values of freedom and opportunity in which america was founded and for which we still stand have mad
greatly. they are senator kay bailey hutchison and senator scout brown. mr. president, in her marvelous book entitled "american heroines: the spirited women who shaped our country," senator kay bailey hutchison wrote the following: "no history can be written appropriately without acknowledging the part women have played in building the greatness of our country. end quote. as my valued colleague and good friend begins a new chapter in her life, i hope that she finds the time to add a new chapter to her own book, one that will be fascinating, inspiring, and auto biographical. like the women that kay celebrates, says an author from amelia earheart, from sally barton to condoleezza rice, kay bailey hutchison is a pioneer, a breaker of barriers. in the special election of 1993, the people of texas made her the first woman to represent them in the united states senate. in the three regular elections since then, they have confirmed their trust in her by ever increasing margins. as the leader of the senate commerce committee, kay has been a strong voice for transportation systems, better, effic
officer: the senator from arizona. mr. mccain: may i thank the senator from maryland, as always, for her usual courtesy and i think she had a very important message and i appreciate not only the words themselves but her eloquence and passion. mr. president, i ask unanimous consent that the senator from south carolina be included in a colloquy during my remarks. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. mccain: mr. president, i, like i believe all of us just finished watching the president's remarks at -- i guess it was the executive office building. and i'm not sure yet as i sort out my impressions of the president's remarks as to whether to be angry or to be saddened. i've been around this town for a number of years, and as is well known, i had an interest in the presidency more than academic and i've watched a lot of presidents, going back to president reagan from the standpoint of a member of congress. and i've watched these other crises as we go through them, whether it be the potential shutdown of the government when newt gingrich was speaker of the house, we've seen these other
of the united states senate, i will present this pin to mrs. inouye in honor of her husband. our gift to her because he gave so many gifts to us. he was a lion in the senate, a real american hero. though gentle in style, he was a fierce warrior when it came to fighting for his nation or standing up for hawaii. when he received his medal of honor, he was rising to the call of the sirens at pearl harbor, volunteering to serve his country, putting aside his own dreams to be a physician. but he went on to be a healer of many wounds. he was decorated in world war ii for saving his fellow soldiers. my experience with senator inouye as a friend was that he was a devoted, dedicated public servant. he was hawaii's first representative of the nation's newest state. he was the first person of japanese heritage ever to be elected to the senate. imagine. he himself knew what it was like to break barriers and to break boundaries. when he came to the senate, he cherished his love for hawaii and its people. he fought tirelessly to improve their lives. now his style was one of absolute civility. he was the
the wife--his wife found out. in one of her diaries, it says, one day, 'spoke to p. about mrs. r.,' and that's the last mention of mrs. r. in mrs. morgan's diaries. so i think that was a fairly dramatic moment. he then had to kind of keep it more secret, and he was not--it's interesting, he was--he lived very--he was much more of a european than an american puritan about all this. the european aristocrats had mistresses. they would travel to other friends' country houses, they would stay in european hotels. they trusted their friends not to talk. it was sort of accepted, especially in the prince of wales' set. he had these women with him, he traveled, and everybody knew about it, and nobody really talked about it. and i think morgan sort of did more or less the same thing. but once his wife found out, it was a problem. and the other problem was that this mrs. randolph was relatively young and not wealthy and she needed a husband, and morgan was not going to get divorced. so a rather convenient solution came along. another prominent american man of their world was william c. whitn
for washington as we can secure yousef in the white house. johnson says no. i am not leaving until mrs. kennedy leaves with me. so we can get her back to washington. won't leave without her husband's body. johnson's as we go to the plane and wait for her and the body there. calm and decisive as if he thought everything through in a moment, that scene on the plane when he gets to the plane also haven't been described from his point of view. we all know the photograph, lyndon johnson standing with his hand up, jacqueline kennedy standing next to him, ladybird on the other side, the judge with the bible administering the oath. it hadn't been told from johnson's point of view and i wanted to do that so for the -- to do that i will talk to everyone who is alive and who was in that room. i talked to mary famer who was johnson's secretary. if you look at that iconic photograph, in the back behind the people you see the top of the young woman sort of curly black head, that is a marie famer's head. what she is doing she told me is checking that johnson takes the oath of office, she is checking to make s
states senate, i present this pin to mrs. inouye in honor of her husband because she gave so many gifts to us. he was a lion in the senate, a real american hero. he was a fierce warrior when it came to fighting for his nation or standing up for hawaii. he received his medal of honor to his wife and pearl harbor. .. he cherished his love for hawaii and its people. now his style was one of absolute stability. he was the one who believed that believe that the decorum of the senate enabled the senate to do the peoples business. he was the essence of stability and he showed that often good manners was good politics that led to good politics. he did not argue the loudest and instead he worked diligently. he marshaled his arguments and with quiet determination he won the day. has a former appropriator i saw that he really got through the air marks. he loved in mark's and what did he do with those earmarks? i can tell you. he made sure that we looked after indian tribes. he made sure we looked after the poorest of the poor in hawaii. his superfund site that had been left by his legacy and he ma
that it is. we really can do without her leadership and support. also, my colleague, mr. tom mcnaught. the work that we have done to not be possible without him. but after the assassination, the taping was dismantled. and everyone said that the secretary mood of the executive office building. the tapes went to a variety of storage locations. robert kennedy actually used them for his book, "thirteen days". there is the reel to reel tapes and the dictaphone. 1983 so we have the first opening, and it is really a fact that the system was actually installed and 62, and 2012, we open and declassify the very last tape. but the entire collection is now open. this book that he had worked on is was the first one to include all of the tapes. >> and if one of these fine people want to go browsing, where would they go? they would go here. >> that's right. people can go to her digital archives now uncertain. on the educational portion of our website, we have a whole website where they come to life and you get to do activities on him. you can actually come to our research room. some people still com
of 18 pay. -- 35 he is egger to win a conviction. by this time mrs. thorton is going forward and come to the defense of her alleged assail i can't and says in the trial at arthur never lifted the ax she never believed he intended to hurt her she felt safe in his presence. he was just -- and she wanted the it to go away. and he did this and this and managed to get ore people to override the testimony. so arthur is convicted. there's only one punishment for that which is the death penalty. and so arthur bowen goes on to death row, and? january of 1836, is sentenced to death. and with the clock ticking, mrs. thorton does something even more -- it was amazing snuff enough she had testified on arthur's behalf on criminal trial. she starts out recruiting her friends in high society and she was very prominent woman. many prominent friend, easy access to the leadership of the country. she weptd to the vice president van buren and said use your good officings with the president jackson, tell him he should pardon arthur, you know. his mother is very good and, you know, she
government. >> mr. chairman, encourager requesting your concerns. >> a day to ask her second pin with a great way to the witness panel beginning with steve haydee who was hurt and served for three consecutive mandates as the armed groups experts on the drc. investigate and co-authored reports submitted and presented to the u.n. security council sanctions committee during the groups expire 2012 mandate he was also coordinator of the six member team working under security council resolution 2021. prior to joining the group of experts, mr. hege worked with organizations. really here with john prendergast, cofounder of the enough project, initiative to end genocide and crimes against humanity. these are the quick administration and the state department congress. he's worked with unicef, human rights, international crisis group and episode five and help launch the sentinel project pictures clingy. mr. prendergast to search for peace in africa for well over a quarter century. then we would hear from mvemba dizolele, who is a visiting fellow at hanford university server is petitioned the professor,
company and says mr. jefferson nine sorry i'm late. and her head explodes because this is supposed to be the embodiment of everything that is wrong in american life, and she just found him to be the most gracious man she had ever met. he could disarm you that way. there is something poetic and the fact that william jefferson clinton is william jefferson clinton. [laughter] by the way, president clinton is still campaigning somewhere. [laughter] i don't know how anyone is going to tell him who voted. maybe he is already starting on the next one. but i want to talk a little bit -- jefferson the politician, jefferson the renaissance man, jefferson the symbol, secessionists wanted a piece of him in the run-up to the civil war, franklin roosevelt wanted him for the new deal and world war ii, he's like winston churchill in the bible he can be used in any way that you need partly because he was so articulate and so proliferate. 20,000 or more letters. brilliantly written, wonderfully eloquent. so what can we make of it? this is the man, the human being we have, and that's what i always wa
. the presiding officer: the senator from mississippi. mr. cochran: mr. president, we wish to thank the distinguished manager of the bill for her courtesies and for her skill in managing this bill. her sensitivity to the need for improvements and sustaining the disaster assistance capabilities of our great country. thank you. mr. paul: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from kentucky. mr. paul: i ask unanimous consent to call up amendments 3376 and 3410 en bloc. the presiding officer: the clerk will report the amendments. the clerk: the senator from kentucky, mr. paul, proposes amendment numbered 3376 and 3410 en bloc. mr. paul: mr. president, when hurricane sandy struck, hundreds -- when hurricane sandy struck the northeast, hundreds of thousands, if not millions of people were without power. we all saw the video footage, we saw the terrible trauma and people are still trying to dig out from underneath the debris of hurricane sandy. during that period of time, hundreds of workers drove up from the south wanting to help. these workers were nonunionized and they were t
. just let's get started. thank you, mr. chairman. >> i think the gentlelady. i also think her for 15 years. we talked about having union station is a true intermodal center. we used to have our people come to the greyhound station to three plot, drag their luggage to union station. we used to go around town to take a bus with satellite location. ms. norton was with me and in 15 minutes we got it done, dedicated, came up for that jury in a very heated election. they thank you for your leadership. not the secretary come but the deputy secretary was instrumental in making nation's capital headteacher intermodal center. i think both of you. ms. edwards. >> thank you, mr. chairman. i want to thank all of our witnesses today and particularly thank secretary lahood. i understand it's your birthday. i don't think i would've chosen to spend my birthday with you, but i'm glad you've chosen to spend your birthday with us. particularly to the chairman for holding this hearing and discussion today about high-speed rail. we had a chance to begin a half ago to go up to new york and less amtrak, but
judge and i look forward to her nomination -- confirmation today. and with that, mr. president, i yield the floor. a senator: mr. president? mr. cornyn: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from texas. mr. cornyn: mr. president, can you tell me how much time is remaining on this side? the presiding officer: 15 minutes. mr. cornyn: thank you. mr. president, it's become disturbingly clear that president obama doesn't mind whether or not we drive off the fiscal cliff. just last week, his own treasury secretary, secretary geithner, said the white house was -- quote -- "absolutely" prepared to go off the cliff unless republicans agree to raise marginal tax rates. in other words, during a period of high unemployment -- the highest since the great depression -- the president's willing to risk another recession in order to increase taxes on small businesses and the people we depend upon to create jobs. how much revenue will the president's tax hike generate? well, by raising the top two rates, it would produce only about $68 billion in 2013. i say "only," because in relationship to
for her opening. >> thank you, mr. chair and thank you for your leadership on this issue in holding this important hearing. while this committee held a hearing on the drc not too long ago, recent event in eastern congo motivated closer examination of this current crisis. i want to especially thank assistant secretary ambassador carson and other witnesses are offering testimony to today's hearing. i would like to commend many of you sitting in the audience for your tireless work towards peace and justice for those affected by the past and current crisis. the concerns have been heard and the committee will elevate the status of drc supersedes the international attention needed to bring about lasting peace and stability. myself, members of the committee and colleagues in the senate are deeply concerned with omicron reports of human rights violations, recruitment of child soldiers and the involvement of drc's been eastern region. which is just scraping for the international community to work on common interest towards the resolution of a crisis that goes well beyond and 23 spirit we mus
. i thank her so much for working so well and hard on this. ms. stabenow: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from michigan. ms. stabenow: thank you very much. i first want to thank senator merkley who has been tireless in bringing forward the issues of the farmers and ranchers in oregon and to my colleagues who are here on the floor from new york and new jersey. i had the opportunity to be in new jersey with senator menendez and to see firsthand also with senator landrieu and senator tester, and it's very, very clear that this is a horrific situation and deserves our attention and support. what we are doing with this amendment, as modified -- i want to thank senator blunt for working with us in cosponsoring the amendment stk-rbs to basically -- is to basically take what we have done and passed in the farm bill and putting it into this very, very important disaster assistance bill. in the spring we experienced late freezes that wiped out many fruit crops in a number of states, including michigan, new york and pennsylvania. in my home state we had a 98% loss of cherry crop
and politically savvy. >> dolly madison loved every minute of it. mrs. monroe hated it, absolutely hated it. >> she warned her husband, you can't rule without including what women want and what women have to contribute. >> during the statement you are a little breathless and there was too much looking down and i think it was a little too fast, not enough change of pace. >> yes, ma'am. >> is probably the most tragic of all of our first ladies. they never should have married. >> she later wrote in her memoir, i, myself, never made any decisions. i only decided what was important and when to present it to my husband. now you stop and think about how much power that is, it's a lot of power. >> prior to this battle against cancer is to fight the fear that accompanies the disease. >> she transformed the way we look at these bugaboos and made it possible for countless people to survive and to flourish as a result. i don't know how many presidents realistically have that kind of impact on the way we live our lives. >> just you can walking around the white house ground i am constantly reminded about
was able to take the lead on this. it was a lot of fun for all of us to see her in action in her first real bill that she handled on the floor as chairman of the appropriations committee. mr. president, on roll call vote 248, i voted "no." it was my intention to vote "aye." therefore, i ask unanimous consent that i be permitted to change my vote since it will not affect the outcome. the presiding officer: is there an objection? without objection. mr. pryor: i yield the floor. the presiding officer: under the previous order, the senate stands adjourned until 1:00 p.m. stands adjourned until 1:00 p.m. >> you don't always find many newspaper editors of many area embracing investigative reporting. but the point is seen number theory says it's not just economics. if the discomfort investigative reporting causes in a newsroom because it's troublesome. it's that for an economics. if you ruffle the feathers of somebody powerful, get it people running into complaint to the editor. we were very fortunate not to 70s and almost all her career's to work for people who were really strong and upgrade in t
not hurt? >>caller: absolutely not because i took the vantage of that. >>host: mr too. >>caller: -- >>caller: =e too. >>caller: it took for ever to try to get hers. >>host: this is for mom, >>caller: yes. >>host: i am so glad you got it before it sells out. . >>caller: is the kindle case still available? >>host: do we have red and orange available? >>caller: do you have the black? >>host: this is a different version with either the mock croc or the solid black. we have the black, orange and the red. >>caller: cannot -- black>>host: kudos to you for getting it for yourself and this get the case because it is more durable than plastic and you can take on the road and this is a sexy the black for everyone and i like the mock croc. i love my and it actually has the mock croc even on the molded (...) >>guest: on the bumpers and that is really nice. >>host: from edge to edge it looks c13 an expensive wallet. we are wildly and you have to take advantage of it now because basically when is gone, it is gone and free shipping and handling and one thing that diane mentio
homeschooled, and listen while providing mr. inhofe if oklahoma who home schools her kids and fears that somehow this convention would hand the power to an unelected group of international bureaucrats to direct the schooling of children and oklahoma. .. if you know what i do and you you. thank you. >> i welcome senator from iowa. >> it has been inspirational to watch them work together in a bipartisan fashion and to bring us to this point. i just hope that you we do not lose that in terms of the vote. i just came over from the dirksen building where we had a wonderful building honoring bob dole. mr. president, some time ago, i went back and i read senator dole's speech on the senate floor. april 14, 1969. mr. president, i would ask that it be included in my remarks that this speech be printed in the record. >> without objection. >> he spoke of the future. of people with disabilities in america. and what we needed to do to change our society. that was 1969, it is 21 years later when we passed the americans with disabilities act. the country has changed so much for the better because
it faster and their model is ready, and i will concede, just let's get started. thank you, mr. chairman. >> i also thank her for 15 years, having union station, a true intermodal center, used to have people come to the greyhound station, drag their luggage to union station, we used to go around town to take a bus, and some satellite location and 15 months we have got that done and dedicated, came up for that during a very heated election but i thank you for your leadership. not this secretary but deputy secretary was instrumental in thanking the nation's capital having a true intermodal, like most of you. >> i want to thank our witnesses for being with us and i want to thank secretary ray lahood. it is your birthday. i would not have chosen to spend my birthday with you but glad you have chosen to spend your birthday with us. particularly to the chairman for holding this hearing and discussion -- a week and half ago to go to new york, bless amtrak forever, even on the assumption, and i do share your view, we have a densely populated corridor in the northeast, that requires no bust devel
them all and good for her. and she has of course appointed a new person mr. nides and i know that's you and you are really going to look at this. i am very very happy that you are going to leave this task force. but you know congress has its obligations too and we have to put our money where our mouth is and we are going to want to make sure that our diplomats are secure and we have to pony up the money. you know it's very easy and you hear rumblings in the conference -- congress about cutting back and lets cut let's cut foreign aid and let's cut foreign security. it's very easy to say that. we have pressing problems here, who cares about what happens overseas? i have heard people say that. that shouldn't he. we need to care and that is what we are doing. let me say this. according to the crs, congress has underfunded state department diplomatic security by $600 million under the request over the last three years. the house funding level was closer to three-quarters of a billion dollars below that. the aarp observe funding restrictions have led the state to be resource constrained rathe
again. may i say, mr. speaker, what a pity. not to see the honorable member -- [inaudible] in her place. but from the jungle she may not have succeeded in talking for the nation on many things, but she did speak for the nation when he called the prime minister and the chancellor two arrogant -- [inaudible] [cheers and applause] mr. speaker, no wonder, no wonder this prime minister keeps on losing his temper, mr. speaker. because his worst nightmare is coming true. not snakes and spiders in the jungle, but their fiscal rule broken, their economic credibility in tatters, exposed now as incompetent and unfair. yes, mr. speaker, he's the chancellor. can't someone get him out of here? [cheers and applause] mr. speaker -- [inaudible] revised up, the fiscal rules broken on every target they set themselves failing, failing, failing, cutting the nhs and not the deficit over 212 billion pounds more borrowing than they promised two years ago, cutting taxes for the rich while struggling families and pensioners pay the price. unfair, incompetent and completely out of touch! [cheers and applause] >>
." because she was in her doughnut hole. well, a couple weeks later, mrs. johnson would be back in the hospital. how wasteful is that? how -- why? why is that -- that costs a tremendous amount of money to our system. this is saving money. this is health care reform. this is medicare reform. it's improving people's health and saving money at the same time. so we have increased benefits, we've extended the life of medicare. that was done as part of health care reform. that is medicare reform. now, in the election, we had a discussion about this. there were a lot of ads about it. we know what governor romney would have done to medicare. he said very explicitly that -- and, again, the presiding officer has quoted this. he said very explicitly he would restore those billions and billions of dollars in overpayments to private insurance companies for no reason, for no good effect, just so that i guess these insurance companies could have more profit. instead, we reinvested this money into medicare. but he would have given it to the insurance companies. he would have replaced the health
she came over to america, and how ultimately her coming across from mexico into america, that sort of spawned this fantastic first generation american story. >> mr. martinez, you were raised in brownsville, texas, right on the border, what was it like during your childhood? >> back then i experienced it as being racially polarized, in a more economic sort of striation, and was very agriculturally based. my parents ran a trucking business that sort of -- basically farm laborers, so kind of a conflicted experience because we would go to school and pretend like we were wealthier than we were, and entirely different, the people who we really are or were, and then we would go home and it was a completely untraditional lifestyle as farm laborers, my brother and myself. my sisters had a different experience. ultimately that was what we knew and what we understood about our environment. >> within the family, what were some of the dynamics? >> my father was latin -- mexico-american. my mother was european-american so that kind of created a very tense -- sort of other complicated household,
: without objection, so ordered. mr. lieberman: i thank the chair. this being probably the last opportunity i will have to do this, but to thank her again for the extraordinary partnership we have had for more than a decade now on the homeland security and governmental affairs committee, and it's really meaningful to me that we have this last opportunity to do something together across party lines that we believe and hope will be in our national interests. i thank the chair, and i yield the floor. the presiding officer: the senator from maine is recognized. ms. collins: thank you, mr. president. mr. president, i'm pleased to join the chairman of the homeland security committee, senator joe lieberman, in submitting for the congressional record our investigative report on the terrorist attack against the u.s. mission in benghazi, libya, that claimed the lives of four americans who were serving our country. this report is indeed the last initiative that the chairman and i will produce together. it is the final work product of ten years of cooperation and collaboration and was authored in the s
for us. reagan sold the book. c-span: go back to 1996 again. you wrote mrs... . >> guest: mrs. reagan. c-span: ...reagan a letter. have you met her, by the way? >> guest: only a couple of times. i've met her--i met her soon thereafter, and--but not many times, no. c-span: did you interview her? i mean, she's interviewed for the book. >> guest: she was interviewed. martin anderson conducted that interview for the book. and--and that was--it was the great confirmation of--of what we'd been finding in the archives. we thought it was important to interview those who were around reagan in the '70s, and so she was one of the most important people. c-span: so you're at the reagan library, simi valley; who brings the boxes to you? how's that work? >> guest: the archivist. have you ever been there? c-span: yes. yeah. >> guest: ok. the archivist brings them out. and they're private papers so they're--they're handled a bit differently than the other papers at the library that--you know, that are open to the public, but--and i just would sit there and go through them. c-span: where were you located
of need. that's what we've always done, and that's what we must do now. i yield the floor. a senator: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from connecticut. mr. blumenthal: thank you mr. president. i want to first begin by thanking my colleague from maryland senator mikulski, for her very kind and generous words about the recent tragedy that we suffered in connecticut and her sense of compassion and kindness in the remarks that she just made but also thank her for her vision and courage and leadership on the legislation before us and associate myself with the very eloquent and powerful remarks made by both senators from new york and the senator from new jersey today and i want to strongly oppose the amendments that would constrict and delay aid that is vital to connecticut as it is to the other states of the region that was hammered and pummelled by storm sandy in the night that it hit our area. the scope and scale of destruction made it one of the largest natural disasters to affect our nation. it left millions of people without homes or electricity. it cost tens of billion
? the presiding officer: the senator from maryland. mr. cardin: let me thank senator shaheen for her leadership on this issue. we've had many discussions about how to advance human rights issues and what is the best strategy to get the sergei magnitsky bill enacted into law. your leadership on the senate foreign relations committee on europe, your leadership in the helsinki commission, you've been one of the real champions on this issue. i just want to thank you, want to thank you for your good advice and for allowing us to be able to get us to this day. i'm convinced tomorrow the senate will pass this legislation. the president is going to sign it, and we will have achieved a great victory for human rights. i thank you. i think also your observations as we were talking about how to move forward with this bill in connection with pntr for russia and as senator lieberman talked about a little bit earlier, i am convinced as important as this bill was, that the magnitsky bill by itself would have been extremely difficult for us to get through for the president and for the president to sign and to b
to get to, drawing a line but she -- before she met mr. right she met mr. wrong and for have a year they had relationship but he didn't get along with her daughter, didn't give him the ok and that led to strain and as he was going out the door, by mutual agreement, he said i am going back on and find someone just like you. and she thought wait a minute. he thinks there is a facsimile of me out there, that i am like a box of cereal. he has to go back -- to dial 7 and pull out someone just like me. so she felt -- okay, she was using this market rhetoric as an orientation to help her get to a human intimate life goal but that this guy had actually gone gold way and was seeing her in a market like way. and she said no, she recoiled, she drew the line. that is alienated. by drawing a line where she is basically doing is saying one side of this line, i will be the emotionally caring, i will be emotionally engaged, i will be attached emotionally to those around me. on the other side of the line i will be detached. nothing wrong with the attachment in its context. the market is a
mentioned, barack obama the story, but to be traveled to kenya with mr. marinus. we did a lot of taping over there, so you can see all of that in the special we did on her website, use the search function in the upper left hand corner watch some of the footage. it was quite a trip to kenya to see that background. yes, sir. >> guest: one of the great person is reporting reporting was he deconstruct it obama's memoir, faith of our fathers. dreams from our fathers. i think i got john mccain -- i had the fathers part right. which he wrote and 95 or so. 95 or 96. marinus went back to less accurate in the book, so it's a great companion to read if you read obama's memoir. >> host: there's some publishers, sentinel cognitive umt, that put out a budget anti, david limbaugh the great destroyer, i am the change and do nice to see obama's america are quite critical of president obama. trained to commit to these sell well? >> guest: they do because they serve right your wrong light as a counterpoint. many readers wish to buy and another results have a very active audience in a president obam
describe how his eyes were. he was charming and gracious and funny and witty and totally beguiling. and her husband, who was the head of the national intelligence, comes in and says, oh, mr. jefferson, i'm sorry i'm late. and margaret bayard smith's head explodes because she just found him to be the most gracious man she'd ever metment -- met. he could disarm you that way. there is something poetic in the fact that william jefferson clinton is william jefferson clinton. [laughter] by the way, president clinton is still campaigning somewhere. [laughter] i don't know how anyone's going to tell him we voted. maybe he's already starting on the next one. i want to talk a little bit, we -- jefferson, the politician, jefferson, the renaissance man, jeff the symbol -- jefferson, the symbol, you know, secessionists wanted a piece of him in the run-up to the civil war, frank lib roosevelt -- franklin roosevelt wanted him in the runup to world war ii. he can be used in any way you need partly because he was so articulate and so prolific. 20,000 or more letters, brilliantly written, wonderfully eloquen
: the leader. mr. reid: i ask unanimous consent the call of the quorum be terminated. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. reid: mr. president, i rise today to honor a woman by the name of janice shelton. for her friendship, and 32 years of dedication as an employee of this body, the united states senate. 25 of those years janice worked as my executive assistant. she's demonstrated a sincere dedication to me, my office, my family, and this body, the united states senate. it's an understatement to say that she will be sorely missed. she will be. she's always been kind and thoughtful to me, to my wife landra, all my children, and to everyone that she comes in contact. if there's a problem, everyone knows, go to janice. no one has my ear the past 25 years like janice shelton has. she has been a professional career creating order where there could easily be chaos. over the course of her productive career with the army, the white house, and the senate, have been each -- each benefited from her unique expertise and professionalism and hard work. she began her professional life at the dep
to this very important conference, and i want to express my gratitude to you and to dr. volkow for her leadership, director control kousky and his new deputy directer, mr. leibowitz, thank you all for being leaders, and a special thanks to dr. johnston because monitoring the future is a treasure for public health, so it's a great pleasure for me to be here. in examining the results that are being unveiled today, we should remember that of all these agents, that tobacco remains the leading cause of premature and preventable death in the united states. smoking kills more than 1200 americans every day, and for every tobacco-related death there are two new replacement cigarette smokers under the age of 26. it's tragic that these replacement smokers are kids who start when they are not fully ready to make an informed choice. and, indeed, you have heard -- and it is true -- that tobacco addiction is a pediatric disease. three out of fourteens who smoke continue to smoke into adulthood, even though they intend to quit, and a typical smoker loses 13-14 years of precious life. so today we annou
reminded her fannie mae was no longer government agency was supposed to be managing its affairs. mrs. harris friend legislation to try to restore more government control over fannie mae. under tried sending flowers to mrs. harris and even a box of fannie mae chocolate's. she sent an back. she said if she ate those chocolates she would become as fast as the profits at fannie mae. the two sides came to a compromise. the department of housing and urban development set goals for fannie's financing of mortgages for poor people if that part of the business ever fell below a certain level. oakley hunter's people figured they had snookered mrs. harris because they promised to do only what they would have done anyway but a precedent had been set. the government could impose quotass on fannie mae. ronald reagan's turn. it was morning in america. peter wallace and was a young whippersnapper in the treasury. surely president reagan would finish the job getting the government completely out of the mortgage business. there was even a perfect pretext. fannie mae was losing money at that time, $1 mi
of the economy and the united states obviously has work to do, my oldest daughter is doing her doctorate in math. there's a substantial contribution to national security in any case. with respect to the dr. jekyll and mr. hyde bit, economic growth is fundamental and innovation is the key engine for that and freedom is the foundation for that. i think we will see this play out in interesting ways globally including within china, and as we work to have a very open system economically and take advantage of technology, we also need to look at what needs to be done to deal with the threats of not just cyber but biotech and so on and look at doing that in partnership, and the partners we look at, and a substantial conversation about the rules of the road in cyberspace, we do that with many others, a fundamental issue. >> got a little bit from global security, the issue of the islands is primarily an issue of energy, and we are seeing it all over the world today, we don't have good mechanisms, maritime energy disputes, not only in the united states and eastern mediterranean, our pick is coming up. with
. [applause] i hope all of you will join me and keeping mrs. reagan in your prayers. she's a remarkable woman who spent a lifetime serving this country and we all cherish her as she continued to play a role at the library. i could come here and not mention nancy for at least a moment. i also want to say, governor, it's great to be back with you. we did a lot of things over the years have been mayor of san diego to u.s. senator, to governor to a leader and a variety of ways. and the tequila scrape people who represent a willingness to serve their state in an important way. it's always engaged when you rub there. thank you poker serving the country. it really does make a difference. it's great to be back here. [applause] i did maybe with us, but were thrilled to have you. we have an american legacy book tour. our very fond of the library as you know someone made a movie called ronald reagan and i want to recognize tonight kevin knobloch and his wife randi. or i was thrilled to be a cabin because such a great job. so we come back to the reagan library from a unique background and you may wonder
leadership on all these adoption issues senator landrieu has shown and look forward to working with her and others as we try to help right this tragic wrong. and i would be glad to yield to my good friend from louisiana. the presiding officer: the senator from louisiana. ms. landrieu: thank you, mr. president. i am proud to join my friend, the senator from missouri, on the floor to add voice to this travesty that has recently occurred. the senator from missouri described the situation accurately, that a country that claims to be a powerful nation on the earth has decided to take powerful action against the weakest, most vulnerable individuals on the earth. and those are children without families. it makes no sense whatsoever for the country of russia to take the action that they did, because they're in a disagreement with us here in america, and maybe others around the world, about human rights violations regarding adults. the russian government in front of the whole world has taken that out, their anger and frustration, on their own children. their own children, who are orphans, their
and be reckoned as. [applause] now we would like to return to her speaker for a traditional city club question and answer. we welcome questions for my phone, putting guests. holding the microphone today is kerry miller. we have our first question please. >> mr. brousard commie talk about complexities facing the average american patient. certainly insurance exchanges in the next year or so will make it more complex. [inaudible] in the drafting of the affordable care act. why didn't humana and the others try to copy the systems of canada and other parts of europe like having a single-payer take care of all medical expenses? 's been a good question. we could probably be here quite some time to answer. from our vantage point, what we see if this is somehow works in canada and it does not have the care level here in the united states. even in the european countries like the u.k., they too have a one payer system. what happens it is cause long lines and health care is delayed in getting to people in the result is a dear. it is a more simpler model under one roof or an ape in a society that can acces
been grateful to have. especially in her darkest hours, men who lead by example and who expect nothing in return. mr. reid: mr. president, i -- the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: yes, i didn't mention -- i should have, but i'm really -- have been waiting the last hour or so to make sure that it was okay with his wife that i came here and said something, so i haven't had time to do much other than feel bad about senator inouye. as i indicated, i talked to irene. i wasn't able to talk to ken, but i did talk to irene. i want to make sure that everyone understands the depth of my feelings -- i'm speaking for the entire senate. he believed in me more than i believed in myself, many, many years ago, a couple decades ago, he said, you know, you're going to do great things in the senate, always talked about my leading the senate, and he always came and said,, oh, always -- you did the right thing by telling you that you did the right thing. the chapter of inouye in the senate is something that is remarkable. not only his military record but what he did with the defense aspec
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